An Update

Quick update for you all. As of May 11, 2016 (which is when I received the signed paperwork), all rights to The Exile’s Violin and the unpublished sequel, Terraviathan, are mine. The series is no longer with PDMI Publications, and I have no further affiliation with them or any of their imprints.

So what does that mean for the series? It means The Exile’s Violin is now out of print, and I’m stopping work on Terraviathan for the foreseeable future. I may have a handful of fans out there who will be disappointed by this news. To you, I’m sorry. There’s a lot of stuff I can’t go into about all this, but finishing Terraviathan and then self-publishing the series is just something I cannot do anytime soon.

Thank you to everyone who bought, read, and loved the book. Thank you to everyone who bought, read, and hated the book. And everyone in between. I’m so, so grateful for all of you.

Moving on, I have lots of other projects in the works. I have a sword and sorcery series that got a tiny bit of agent and publisher attention. That’ll be revisited sometime soon. And I have another urban fantasy novel in the works. My sights are set on getting better as a writer, at not being fucking scared to find my voice.

I’ll come back to Jacquie Renairre and her steampunk world someday. I just don’t know when that will be.

‘Til then, I’ll be over here scribblin’ words and makin’ up worlds.

Let’s Talk About: Star Wars: Aftermath by Chuck Wendig

I have some thoughts about Aftermath by Chuck Wendig and the state of the Star Wars Expanded Universe in general. On the one hand, it’s kind of exciting to start with a fresh slate; the byzantine EU of decades of comics, books, RPG tie-ins, video games, and more is gone. So the post-Return of the Jedi universe is brand new for everybody. But on the other hand, I have some questions and thoughts about what Disney’s doing. And finally, I have some specific thoughts about Wendig’s book–the first official canon, post-RotJ story that’s going to help set the stage for The Force Awakens.

The New Expanded Universe

I wish I could be a fly on the wall inside Disney. I want to listen in on their Star Wars-related conversations and meetings. And I wish I could get a behind-the-scenes look at the communication between Wendig and Disney. Because the entire old Expanded Universe is now marked as “Legends” then it stands to reason that pretty much everything was thrown out.

But at the same time, in order to keep a sense of continuity between this new canon and the old canon, some stuff’s been retained. For example, Aftermath makes a reference to a Carrack-class cruiser. If I remember correctly, that ship was first introduced as part of an RPG sourcebook. Wouldn’t that be part of the old, discarded EU canon?

What gets to be included in the new canon and what is truly gone? Or are things like ship classes not really gone, just on a back shelf until an author, comic book creator, video game company gets permission from Disney to resurrect them? The nerd in me wants to know!

databank_superstardestroyer_01_169_d5757b90

This is especially poignant when you consider the epilogue to Aftermath. I won’t give it away because spoilers, but if it turns out the way I’m hoping… then it would be really cool and another instance of something from the huge Ex-Expanded Universe finding its way to the new canon.

Sidebar: It was hilarious and a bit of a trip to open Aftermath and go to the page where it said “The DelRey Star Wars Timeline” and there were only like 10 things. It listed the 7 movies, Rebels, and a couple of other official books. For somebody’s who’s used to the two-page spread that goes from 10,000 BBY to over 100 years AE seeing such a short timeline was weird.

Aftermath: The Book

So that was Aftermath as a cultural artifact, but what about Aftermath the book? It was okay. I appreciate what Wendig is trying to do with the use of present tense, but it’s not really my bag. It’s definitely a “Wendig book” through and through, but with the inventive curses from the Miriam Black series replaced with Star Wars sanitized versions.

Sidebar: He really likes the phrase “pistons a fist” to refer to somebody punching somebody else. “Character Y pistons a fist into Character X’s side…” It was really prevalent in the last few chapters. 

My biggest complaint about the book is that it felt long. And for being a Star Wars novel, the first new one post RotJ, the action felt confined–makes sense as the book was set mostly on one Outer Rim planet, Akiva.

Rae_Sloane_Orientation

Wendig attempts to give a more galactic perspective with numerous interludes, but to me they just slowed things down. Hopping from world to world–many of them not featured in previous books/comics/etc. (at least as far as I know) and spending a brief few pages with random characters… It was hard to care.

The more successful interludes were ones that focused on Mon Mothma and Admiral Ackbar.

Another thing that bothered me–and will probably be addressed in future books–was how vague everything was. With only interludes giving glimpses of the galaxy at large, I was left wondering:

  • How long ago was Endor?
  • Have the Rebels taken Coruscant?
  • How long does it take to get from planet to planet?

The last one is more important than you might think. It’s an important plot point where Imperial Admiral Rae Sloane is figuring out whether to withdraw. She says that the New Republic could have a fleet to Akiva in a few hours, a fleet large enough to take on her three Star Destroyers. And it just made me think? Where would they be staging from? I was under the impression that it sometimes took days in hyperspace to get from place to place. It was just a potentially incongruous bit to the novel.

As for the other two points: the interludes try to give you a bigger picture, but most of the time the only other hints you get are exposition from characters. Over and over characters mention Imperial governors have been defecting to the New Republic. It’s also mentioned that somebody within the Empire has been feeding intelligence to the New Republic to facilitate their string of victories, but what string? How many? Where? When?

Here’s a thing I had 0 problems with and want to point out with a big ol’ fuck yeah: Three of the main characters are women. Admiral Sloane is a woman of color. Multiple characters are gay. Yes. The Star Wars galaxy is a big fuckin’ place; it’s characters should reflect how wide and diverse it should be.

A lot of my issues with Aftermath’s pacing come from the fact that it’s the first book in a new trilogy, and the first new canonical book in the timeframe leading up to Episode VII. So it’s gotta spend some time setting things up; I just feel like it took a bit too long to get there. I mean the Inglourious Basterds vibe I got at the end where a second book might go was super cool. Admiral Sloane is super cool too. Give me some space battles! Give me the Empire turning into an insurgency. Cool stuff. Personally, I’d love to see his new characters interact with the OT heroes a bit more. The glimpses we got of them in the interludes weren’t enough!  (But please never refer to Coruscant’s city as Coco-Town ever again. Please.)

All things considered, I can’t wait to see where Wendig goes next. It’s a big ‘ol galaxy of narrative potential out there waiting to be explored.

 

Who is Jacquie Renairre?

No, the title of this post isn’t some weird Atlas Shrugged reference. Instead it’s a jumping off point to looking at the main character of my Tethys Chronicles steampunk series. You’ve seen the covers of The Exile’s Violin and the upcoming Terraviathan, right? I’ll post ’em here. Take a gander; don’t worry, I’ll wait.

The Exile's Violin (Tethys Chronicles #1) by R.S. Hunter

And now for Terraviathan!Terraviathan (Rara Avis cover)

(A big thank you to Enggar Adirasa for the art and the fine folks at Rara Avis for the cover design. If these two books don’t scream steampunk to you, then just take my word for it. There’s steam and punk in them, even if they don’t take place in Victorian England or even our world)

So Jacquie Renairre is the woman on the front of both books (shocking, right? Having the main character on the cover?) But who is she?

Simply put: Jacquie Renairre is a survivor. Jacquie Renairre is somebody who doesn’t give up. Jacquie Renairre is a woman.

I’m not going to lie when I first started writing The Exile’s Violin, I didn’t have any particular reason as to why I wanted the main character to be a young woman in her 20s. I just thought it would be cool. And to be quite honest, that’s what drove a lot of the initial planning for the book.

But then things went deeper than that.

As I wrote and outlined, I knew I needed more to my main character than “it’d be cool to have a steampunk book with a woman private eye main character.” So what did I do next? I made character sheets. (Maybe someday I’ll share them with the world, but not on this day!)

I examined situations and beliefs that a character in this fantasy world might encounter and thought, how would Jacquie react to this? What would she do? What would she believe in? What would she fight for? I looked to other people I know, most importantly my wife. I asked, how would her sarcasm and–not going to lie–her vengeful streak come out, sometimes even at inopportune times? And the answers to those questions became the basis for Jacquie.

By the end of the book, after numerous drafts (and that’s a blog post for another time–how many drafts it took to get the book into the shape it’s in now) Jacquie Renairre emerged as a character who it’s really easy for me as a writer to get into.

Jacquie Renairre is more than just a “cool action hero.” She’s a character who’s been wronged in the past and carries those scars with her wherever she goes, who won’t let those scars hold her back, and she’s someone who will stop at nothing to fight for what she believes is right. She’s a character who has a multitude of stories within her.

But don’t just take my word for it. Read Jacquie’s story and draw your own conclusions. The Exile’s Violin out now from Rara Avis, and then come back when the sequel is released. I want to know what you all think!

Why hire mercenaries to kill an innocent family just to obtain one little key?

That question haunts Jacquie Renairre for six years as she hunts down the people responsible for murdering her parents.

Not even accepting an assignment to investigate a conspiracy that aims to start a war can keep her from searching for the key. Armed with her father’s guns and socialite Clay Baneport at her side, she continues her quest for answers abroad.

With the world edging closer to disaster, Jacquie is running out of time to figure out how the war, the key, and ancient legend are intertwined. The fate of the world hinges on her ability to unravel both mysteries before it’s too late.

Available Now:

Direct from the Publisher

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Let’s Talk About: Ganymede by Cherie Priest

Cherie Priest is a talented writer. I love her Clockwork Century setting with its alt-history + steampunk + zombies mashup. However, Ganymede was just ok and kinda boring. The characters are great. You have Josephine Early, madam of a high class establishment and spy for the Union, trying to get an experimental submarine out of the New Orleans bayous and into Union hands. And then series regular(?), guest star(?) Andan Cly, a tall dude and airship pilot, also a former pirate.ganymede cover

Great stuff. Great supporting cast. Great central premise. There should be tons of tension to this plot. But none of the “expected spy story” plot beats ever happen. Josephine is afraid that the Confederates and their Texian allies are onto her, but never once does it *actually* happen. Nobody questions her, suspects her, searches her place, nothing like that. Every time she goes out and is doing the “watching her back for tails” type thing, it never manifests into anything.

And then when it comes time to move the Ganymede sub: the book tells the reader that it’s tense, full of danger, that the Texians (that spelling/term bothered me; no idea why) or the Confederates could spot them at any time. But it never happens. They move the sub without a hitch.

Okay I can buy that. That part of the story *was* tense. So to have nothing terrible happen lets the reader breathe a sigh of relief. It also makes them think “Okay, they made it through that. But what about what’s next?” Cool. I’m all on board with that.

Once the Ganymede is put into the Mississippi River, it comes time to sail her to the gulf. The crew decides to make a stop at Barataria Bay to help out some pirates who are putting up one massive fight against the occupying Texians. Cool! This part of the book is going to be the climactic “Final Battle” so to speak. I was fully expecting for something to go wrong as the Ganymede sneaked into the battle and started picking off Texian boats.

Nope. They never once take any hits or anything. There’s no scene with the sub taking on water. Nothing. The entire climax had no tension. The good team blows up some bad guy boats and then moves on. And then the scene Josephine’s been waiting for the entire book–reaching the airship carrier Valiant and turning over the Ganymede to the Union–is *told* to us in a quick little paragraph. So the supposed payoff isn’t even shown to the reader.

Overall, Ganymede (the book, not the underwater craft) felt like a first draft. It took forever for the two main characters to meet up, and then when they finally do, everything goes their way. Lots of things are told to the reader rather than shown. And even a surprising revelation about one of the supporting characters near the end is never explored. It would’ve been so awesome and unexpected to have that be a bigger focus. As it was I just went “Ohhh. Ohhh. Cool. I see what she did there.” and then didn’t really give it another thought because the book ended a few pages later.

It’s clear that there are bigger things happening in the world while the story of Ganymede is taking place, and like I said before, Priest is talented and inventive. I’m going to finish this series–not out of some sense of duty and finishing what I started–but because I genuinely want to. And it’s the fact that the series and previous books, Boneshaker and Dreadnought especially, have been so fun that makes Ganymede such a letdown.

Let’s Talk About: The Mirror Empire by Kameron Hurley

The Mirror Empire by Kameron Hurley

I don’t really do book “reviews” per se, but I just finished Kameron Hurley’s latest novel, the epic fantasy The Mirror Empire. Since I have lots of thoughts (and feels too as the kids say) I figured I’d jot them down here in a loose sorta way. There will be some spoilers so read on at your own risk.

1. The Mirror Empire is the first book in the Worldbreaker Saga. Points for having a badass title and series name. This isn’t an in-depth thought. I just like the name.

2. As Justin mentions in his review, the world of The Mirror Empire starts in a state of flux–and flux seems to be the status quo for the world(s). The world of the story is orbited by “satellites” (moons? comets? actual man-made thingies? No clue and probably not important), and these satellites give certain people magical wizard powers. The closest comparison I can think of is the bending powers from Avatar: the Last Airbender. But each satellite also waxes and wanes at irregular intervals, so each wizard faction can gain and lose power at random. This means the worldview for almost every country in the world is based on change. It’s awesome how deep this theme of change permeates the book.

3. However, because everything is in a state of change–satellites, a bad moon rising so to speak, impending civil war, impending invasion (more on this later), it felt a little hard to get everything straight in the book. Plus, being epic fantasy, there are multiple point-of-view characters in The Mirror Empire. Keeping them straight, their allegiances, their friends and families, and even genders straight can be overwhelming at first. (This may also be partially user error as I tend to read right before bed, so sometimes I fall asleep reading)

4. Lots of stuff happens in The Mirror Empire, but at times, it felt like the opposite. It’s the first book in a trilogy (series?) so a lot of the stuff (heady, dare I say world-breaking even) can feel like setup for future books. There’re quite a few threads and by the end of the book it feels like they’re just starting to really tie together. But I get it, you can’t cover everything and you have to end a book somewhere otherwise it becomes a never ending tome.

Mirror Empire map

5. Hurley some really cool stuff with gender/gender roles in this book. So there’s an assassin that can change their biological sex at will or basically at will. So that character embodies the theme of change in the book. One culture has five different genders each with their own pronouns and an individual gets to decide how they view themselves and which gender they want to be referred as. Cool stuff!

5b. But it goes further than that. One of the cultures, Dorinah, is a matriarchy. So one of the POV characters is a high ranking general. Basically take all of the stereotypes you see male characters think about women in fantasy books (and elsewhere too!) and then flip them around. When you read a passage about this general catcalling a man and then thinking “Well, he just got upset because he doesn’t have a sense of humor,” it’s biting. It hits home because I’ve seen it in real life and on the internet. Women don’t have senses of humor; they’re too sensitive; can’t they just see that men are trying to compliment them? The Dorinah culture in The Mirror Empire flips this all around and man it makes for some caustic satire.

5c. That’s not to say that we’re supposed to read the general as 100% in the right. Or that readers shouldn’t criticize her actions or the actions of her nation. Hurley’s writing makes it clear that we’re supposed to engage all of this critically.

6. Rideable bears. With forked tongues, big-ass claws, and cat-like eyes. Seriously. Rideable bears. Read this book.

7. Alternate universes. That’s one of The Mirror Empire’s big hooks. It’s like Fringe meets epic fantasy meets plant-punk or something. It’s awesome but also a bit confusing. At times I couldn’t remember who was from what universe, and it’s mentioned in an off-hand way that there are more than two universes out there. So when people in World A mention invaders, I think they’re talking about World B. But then I swear people in World B mentioned invaders. Are they being invaded too? And really their invasion of World A is just another word for retreat? Cool stuff, a bit confusing, and I think it will be explored even more in future books.The Mirror Empire cover

8. The characters, especially the POV ones, didn’t quite grab me as much as those in Hurley’s Bel Dame Apocrypha series. I get it though. As a writer you don’t want to just create the same main character over and over again. I appreciate that there’s a wide variety of personality types on display here, and all the characters have agency in their own way. Still, and this is just personal stuff (YMMW), I didn’t feel a huge connection to any of them. I think I cared about Lilia the most and probably Roh the least. I’d love to see more of Taigan too.

9. You can’t help but use the word “ambitious” to describe The Mirror Empire. It’s sprawling, but also personal at the same time. Occasionally the number of concepts thrown at you can be overwhelming, and for me, the characters didn’t quite hit the mark. But seriously, what else is like this on the market right now? I honestly can’t tell you. Despite a few flaws, you have to applaud Hurley’s ambition and the way she throws the reader into the deep end of everything. But unlike the Malazan books, I was never too lost that I gave up. In fact, I finished The Mirror Empire pretty damn quickly. The only bad thing about devouring it so fast is that I have a longer wait until book two comes out.

10. The Mirror Empire, her previous Bel Dame novels, plus her nonfiction collection, We Have Always Fought, only cement in my mind that Hurley is a writer to watch and one I want to learn from.